Frequently Asked Questions                            

Exactly what’s in the ordinary (green label) Marigold Bouillon powder?

Is there salt in Marigold Bouillon ?

How can I use Marigold Bouillon?

Will Marigold Bouillon affect my allergies?

Where does it come from?

What exactly is ‘Hydrolysed Vegetable Protein’? Does it contain MSG?
 
How is HVP made?  

What about Palm Oil?

And Nutrition?

As a breastfeeding mother, can I safely consume the Engevita Savoury Yeast Flakes?

 

Exactly what’s in the Regular (green label) Marigold Bouillon powder?

Sea Salt
Hydrolised vegetable protein (soy, maize)
Potato Starch
Vegetable fat (sunflower)
8% Vegetables (celery, onions, carrots, leeks)
Lactose
Spices (turmeric, white pepper, garlic, mace, nurmeg).
Herbs (parsley, lovage)


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Is there salt in Marigold Bouillon ?

Sodium is the active element of sea salt (Sodium Chloride) and represents roughly 40% of the salt content in the bouillon. So it’s quite a substantial part of the dry product.
Most users dilute the powder - as recommended. The standard product in solution, for example, would be about 2%.
If you find the product too salty - add water to suit your own taste. And vice versa.
Our company is required to show the sodium content on our labels.
We have especially formulated a reduced salt version for people concerned about sodium intake.

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How can I use Marigold Bouillon?

There are at least 3 ways:
1. It’s a delicious hot drink – just add a teaspoon to boiling water. Only 12 calories per cup.
2. Use it as a stock for making soup. Use 4 tsp per litre.
3. Sprinkle lightly to enhance the flavour of any savoury dish: for instance casseroles, stews, rice and grain dishes.

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Will Marigold Bouillon affect my allergies?

You probably already know that Marigold bouillon contains no preservatives, artificial flavourings, colourings, emulsifiers or stabilisers. All this is great for anyone – with or without allergies.
The standard Marigold Bouillon (green packaging) is gluten free and yeast free, but it does contain lactose.
The reduced salt version (purple packaging) is dairy free and yeast free. It contains maltose, which has a small amount of gluten.
The peanut oil used in earlier versions of both, has no protein structure and is non-allergenic.

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Where does it come from?

It’s made in Switzerland - per Quality Control System EN29001. And it meets the Food Standards for Great Britain and is EU accredited

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What exactly is ‘Hydrolysed Vegetable Protein’ (HVP)? Does it contain MSG?  

The HVP (Hydrolysed Vegetable Protein) used in Marigold Vegetable Bouillon does not contain any MSG.

The HVP contains only naturally contained glutamates that are derived from the raw materials used to make the HVP. That’s wheat and maize. Wheat and maize are made up of fats, fibres, moisture, carbohydrates, proteins, and so on. The proteins in wheat and maize are composed of amino acids such as leucine, phenylalanine and glutamic acid commonly found in food. So the naturally occurring glutamates in HVP are derived from the naturally occurring glutamic acids in wheat and maize protein.

The glutamates present in the HVP are not present in a concentrated form like MSG. They are naturally present in proportion to the other naturally occurring amino acids in the HVP. And because the glutamates have not been added to the HVP artificially but are naturally occurring, no declaration has ever been required other than that of HVP.

In any case, glutamate is an essential and vital constituent of the human body and occurs naturally in many foods such as the following: Peas • Potatoes • Tomato Juice • Grape Juice • Cheese • Mother's Milk

The quantity of natural glutamate in an 8fl oz serving of Marigold Vegetable Bouillon, at a dilution of 18g per 1 litre, is equivalent to the amount of naturally occurring glutamate in: 5g of cheddar, 10g of Parmesan, a medium sized potato, or a small glass of tomato or grape juice.

Did you know that one of the highest concentrations of naturally occurring glutamate is to be found in mother's milk?

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How is HVP made?

Hydrolised Vegetable proteins are recognised by the food industry as versatile base flavour components in a wide variety of products.

(Warning: Serious technical-speak follows!)
HVPs are produced by the hydrolysis of a plant protein source. All proteins are composed of Amino Acids linked together via the peptide bond into complex molecules. The reaction of hydrolysis is the addition of water across the peptide bond resulting in the breakdown of the protein chain. Hydrolysis literally means splitting by water. The hydrolytic reaction can be catalysed by enzyme or chemical methods. The most common catalyst used industrially is hydrochloric acid.

The most common protein source is the part separated during the extraction of plant/vegetable oil. The typical raw material sources are soy, wheat, groundnut and rapeseed. (That’s wheat and maize in Marigold Bouillon)

The protein source and catalyst (usually hydrochloric acid) form the charge and are added to the reaction vessel which is heated under pressure. After completion of the reaction, the acid is neutralised by a suitable sodium alkali. Since the acid acts as a catalyst it takes no part in the reaction and remains after hydrolysis and therefore neutralisation is required. The products of neutralisation are water and sodium chloride. It is this step in the process that creates the salt level in HVP. Since the primary function of this material is in savoury products, this is not an undesirable attribute. The hydrolysis may be accelerated by any acid, however Hydrochloric acid is the most preferred catalyst primarily because of the products of neutralisation.

After neutralization, the liquid is filtered to remove residual material which has not undergone hydrolysis and transferred to a storage vessel. At this stage the product has approximately 40% solids and can be supplied in this form as liquid HVP

The liquid can be concentrated through vaporisation to give a paste with a solids content of approximately 85% and can be supplied in this form. More commonly, however, the paste is vacuum oven-dried to yield a powder with a total solids content in the region of 98%. After drying the product is milled to form the powder and a small amount of vegetable oil (approx. 1.5%) is added. HVPs are very hydroscopic in nature, the addition of the vegetable oil is to coat the particles to reduce the tendency of the powder to pick up moisture.

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What about Palm Oil?

Palm oil is used instead of hydrogenated fat, which is forbidden by organic standards, as it is considered to be very unhealthy.

Responsible sourcing of Palm Oil
There has been some television coverage about the production of palm oil in which ancient forests were unscrupulously bulldozed before the planting of palm oil plantations in Asia. Please be advised that we use RSPO Certified Sustainable palm oil from Brazil.

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And Nutrition?

Precise details of the nutrition value of each Marigold Health Foods product is clearly stated on the label. For instance, in the Organic (red label) bouillon, the energy value for a 5g serve is 10 kcal and 42 kJ. Other typical values detailed include protein, carbohydrate, fat, dietary fibre and sodium.

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As a breastfeeding mother, can I safely consume the Engevita Savoury Yeast Flakes?

Yes. According to Dr Elyane Brighlight, nutritional yeast is excellent for nursing mothers, as it provides extra protein and Vitamin B - and gives lots of energy too, something new mothers often need. But make absolutely sure to have enough calcium as well. Take extra calcium daily, and also eat yoghurt.

If you have any other questions about Marigold Health Foods products, please email us.